Blog Archives

Count to Ten – Take 2

We introduced Jude to Oscar’s 1-10 Balloons app. He learned to count to ten and read from left to right! Just kidding. He learned that learning can be frustrating. He did not want to play that one more than once, unlike his sister.

He did, however, enjoy showing off his eyeballs. He seriously can’t get enough of the Baby Play Face app. The app comes with different baby face characters; I wonder if he would still be into it if I picked an avatar that didn’t look so much like him. Hmmm…

Lastly, we introduced him to Sign Shine. This was one of Stella’s absolute favorites starting at 18 months. Jude was equally enthralled. I could tell he wanted to do so much more with his hands other than clap but just didn’t know how…YET! He already loves to sign baby basics (more, all done, eat, etc.), so it will be really fun to teach him some of these over the next few weeks. Sign Shine makes an easy case for using digital media together to enhance its educational value.

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“Stellar” Rendition of Twinkle Little Star

The *signing* is not exactly pitch perfect, but the *signing* is pretty good! The sign for “star” is made by rubbing the sides of your index fingers together. The “Like a diamond in the sky” part (loosely translated by Stella as “Like a da-do-da-da-da”) is signed by using your right hand to make the letter “d” and tapping it on your left ring finger as you raise it toward the sky. When she is in the stroller, you can see her attempt this sign—she even gets the right finger! Stella learned how to sign this song from the SignShine app.

I wake up to this song belting through the baby monitor about every other day. 🙂

Baby Sign Language App

I bought this Baby Sign Language app by EverydayASL.com a few months ago, but she hasn’t seemed ready for it until now. I know ASL pretty well, so I’ve been teaching her basic signs without the app since she was about 6 months old. Lately her attention span and level of interest in learning new words has jumped, so we gave this app a try today.

The app offers two very different experiences for horizontal or vertical modes. Each flash card includes a picture of a word, audio of the word, and a video of the word signed. I tend to draw more towards flash card apps that use more realistic pictures, but Stella seemed to understand the cartoon drawings just fine. My only complaint is that when you are in horizontal mode, the video for each sign skips really fast the first time you watch it, so you have to tap it again. (You’ll see it happen in the video.)

It’s not an app that Stella can run independently yet because you have to manually tap to hear the word or watch the video. When left alone with the app, Stella just wants to paw the screen to see the pictures move. By the time she’s old enough to use this app on her own, her speech will probably be advanced enough that she won’t need signs to communicate. But for $1.99, it’s still a neat app—even if you use it to teach vocabulary without the signs.